When you feel responsible for everything that happens in your life, you will feel that everything is joyful, because nothing can make you powerless. So, empower yourself with responsibility and unlock the power of feeling.

In these verses from 2.31 to 2.38, Kṛṣṇa works on Arjuna at two levels. At one level He talks to Arjuna at the super conscious plane educating him on what the ultimate Truth is.

He talks to Arjuna about how the undying and indestructible spirit lives on. Here, Kṛṣṇa addresses Arjuna’s fears about killing his svajanam, his relatives, elders and teaches him that what he considers to be the end of life for these people is just one step in their journey.

It is not what you do that matters; it is who you are being that matters. It is your space that matters. Whether you are being complete or incomplete matters. Continue reading →

Spirituality is the total understanding and cognition of completion with life – materially, physically, emotionally, relationally and in all senses without any incompletion and responding to life with the four tattvas, spiritual principles of integrity, authenticity, responsibility and enriching.

Every thought, every desire you have is a commitment you have given to yourself. Every thought you complete is a word you have given to you. You have to honor it. You cannot entertain any thought of fear or greed, doubt or denial because you are literally sitting under a kalpataṛu, a wish-fulfilling tree, all the time!

Completion means feeling empowered, feeling powerful, without any hangover, without feeling powerless, during and after every situation in your life!

There is a beautiful story.

Once a traveler was resting under a tree in a forest, without knowing that the tree was a Kalpataṛu. Continue reading →

You cannot fight life or death. They are both beyond you, out of your control. You can marvel at them and be happy and joyous.

When you understand what Kṛṣṇa is saying in these verses (2.26 – 2.30) you get over any fear of death . In fact you will celebrate death.

Sometime ago, when I was delivering a discourse in India, news arrived that my father had died. I continued with the discourse. Later that night, many of our disciples traveled with me to Tiruvannamalai where the body lay. If you see the videos of this event, you will find that my mother never once cried. She is a very traditional person, brought up in a rural environment that sets great importance on social behavior. When one’s husband dies one is naturally heartbroken; especially as in the case of my mother and father, who were very close to each other. His departure would have been a great loss to her. She understood the meaning of these verses of Kṛṣṇa without me ever having to explain them to her. Continue reading →