Life is like a river. If you place your hands in the river and keep them open, the river will always be there in your hands. But if you try to hold it, you will have only empty hands!

Please be very clear, again and again Kṛṣṇa declares:

karmendriyāṇi saṁyamya ya āste manasā smaran I

indriyārthān vimūḍhātmā mithyācāraḥ sa ucyate II 3.6

If you can’t create completion in your inner space, even if you control your body or your senses, you are just a hypocrite. Your life will not be a complete, blissful life. Not only will it not be a spiritual life, it will not even be life! The meaning of living is bliss, but there is no purpose. The more you think about purposes, the more worries you will create; the more will you try to squeeze the most out of life. But life is much more intelligent than you. When you try to squeeze the maximum out of life, it just slips through your fingers. Continue reading “Life is like a river. If you place your hands in the river and keep them open, the river will always be there in your hands. But if you try to hold it, you will have only empty hands!”

If any religion gives you a manual, that religion is born from violence and will continue to flourish in violence. In the Bhagavad Gītā, you will rarely see Kṛṣṇa giving Arjuna instructions. All seven hundred verses are literally nectars of inspiration uttered out of Bhagavān Kṛṣṇa’s love and compassion.

In the previous chapter on Sāṅkhya Yogaḥ, Kṛṣṇa tells Arjuna that knowledge of the Self is the supreme path to Enlightenment. He explains the nature of the indestructible Self. Kṛṣṇa tells Arjuna to shed all root patterns of fear, abandon his desires and go beyond success and failure; to practice authenticity in action, to be unattached and steady in completion of the Self, the state of Brahman.

Arjuna is still in the space of inauthenticity. He is confused as to what he should do. At one level, he understands what Kṛṣṇa says to him. However, the explanation about the spirit living on while the body dies, and the idea that all those he is about to fight and destroy have already been destroyed in the cosmic sense, does not appeal to him. Arjuna is a warrior. To him, what is seen in front of him is what exists. He sees all his elders and relatives arrayed against him in battle and he has to make a choice to kill or be killed. This is the physical reality that he faces. Kṛṣṇa tells him not to take this reality seriously. He says all the living people in front of him are already dead, and therefore he is committing no sin by killing them again. In fact, if he does not fight them, he is being out of integrity; by running away from the battle as an inauthentic coward. He also tells Arjuna that he has the right to do his duty but no right to its results. Continue reading “If any religion gives you a manual, that religion is born from violence and will continue to flourish in violence. In the Bhagavad Gītā, you will rarely see Kṛṣṇa giving Arjuna instructions. All seven hundred verses are literally nectars of inspiration uttered out of Bhagavān Kṛṣṇa’s love and compassion.”

Your own Existential experience is only one, your ātman, self. Everything else is your perceptional experience. If you remember in the dream, is this perceptional reality or existential reality?, you will wake up. In the waking state, if you remember, is this perceptional reality or existential reality?, you will be awakened.

Kenopanishad. The sacred secrets revealed in the Kenopanishad.  The 3rd and 4th mantra in the second khanḍaḥ of Kenopanishad.

yasyāmataṁ tasya mataṁ  mataṁ yasya na veda saḥ
avijñātam vijānatāṁ vijñātmavijānatām || 3||

The 4th verse recite along with Me:

pratibodhaviditaṁ matamamṛtatvaṁ hi vindate
ātmanā vindate vīryaṁ  vidyayā vindate ‘mṛtam || 4 ||

I’ll read out the translation for the 3rd and 4th verse, then reveal the sacred secrets.

He by whom, It is not known, to him It is known and experienced; he by whom, it is Known, to him, It is not known or perceived. It is unknown to those, who think they know It well and known to those, who know It not.

The 4th Verse:

It is truly known, when the Self is consciously cognized and subjectively known to oneself in each state of Consciousness with every modification of the mind and intellect. Through such complete, matured cognition of the Pure Self is attained immortality, amṛtatvam —existence in one’s own Self. By Ātman, the Pure Self is attained real strength, the space of powerfulness. And by Vidyā, Complete Knowledge of the Self is experienced Immortality, which is the true nature of Ātman.

Continue reading “Your own Existential experience is only one, your ātman, self. Everything else is your perceptional experience. If you remember in the dream, is this perceptional reality or existential reality?, you will wake up. In the waking state, if you remember, is this perceptional reality or existential reality?, you will be awakened.”

Find that existence of you which gives you a complete feeling that it cannot be changed, it cannot be questioned, it cannot be taken away from you.

Lets have Mahaganapati’s blessings and enter into the Kenopanishad 4th verse. I will continue of expand on 4th verse of the Kenopanishad.

pratibodhaviditaṁ matamamṛtatvaṁ hi vindate
ātmanā vindate vīryaṁ  vidyayā vindate ‘mṛtam || 4 ||

It is truly known, when the Self is consciously cognized and subjectively known to oneself, pratibodha in each state of Consciousness with every modification of the mind and intellect. Through such complete cognition of the Pure Self is attained immortality, amṛitatvam – existence in one’s own Self.

By Ātman, the Pure Self is attained real strength, the space of powerfulness achieved by celibacy and brahmacharya. And by Vidyā, Complete Knowledge of the Self is experienced Immortality , amṛitatva, which is the true nature of Ātman. Continue reading “Find that existence of you which gives you a complete feeling that it cannot be changed, it cannot be questioned, it cannot be taken away from you.”